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Deadlines kill innovation…



I just read an article from Fast Company entitled “4 Myths About Apple Design, From An Ex-Apple Designer.”  I could not help make the connection between the culture of “schools” and Apple’s culture.

It was based on an interview with Mark Kawano who was a senior designer at Apple.  In the article, he dispels four commonly held beliefs about Apple Design.

I’ll let you make the connections with these excerpts:

Myth #1    Apple has the best designers.  

“It’s actually the engineering culture, and the way the organization is structured to appreciate and support design. Everybody there is thinking about UX and design, not just the designers. And that’s what makes everything about the product so much better . . . much more than any individual designer or design team.”

It has often been said that good design needs to start at the top—that the CEO needs to care about design as much as the designers themselves. People often observe that Steve Jobs brought this structure to Apple. But the reason that structure works isn’t because of a top-down mandate. It’s an all around mandate. Everyone cares.

“It’s not this thing where you get some special wings or superpowers when you enter Cupertino. It’s that you now have an organization where you can spend your time designing products, instead of having to fight for your seat at the table, or get frustrated when the better design is passed over by an engineering manager who just wants to optimize for bug fixing. All of those things are what other designers at other companies have to spend a majority of their time doing. At Apple, it’s kind of expected that experience is really important.”

Kawano underscores that everyone at Apple—from the engineers to the marketers—is, to some extent, thinking like a designer. In turn, HR hires employees accordingly. Much like Google hires employees that think like Googlers, Apple hires employees that truly take design into consideration in all of their decisions.

“You see companies that have poached Apple designers, and they come up with sexy interfaces or something interesting, but it doesn’t necessarily move the needle for their business or their product. That’s because all the designer did was work on an interface piece, but to have a really well-designed product in the way Steve would say, this ‘holistic’ thing, is everything. It’s not just the interface piece. It’s designing the right business model into it. Designing the right marketing and the copy, and the way to distribute it. All of those pieces are critical.”

Myth #3 Apple Crafts Every Detail With Intention

“It’s almost impossible to come up with really innovative things when you have a deadline and schedule.”

“It was more having a small team and knowing what people had worked on, and the culture of being comfortable sharing.”

Myth #4 Steve Job’s Passion Frightened Everyone

“The reality is, the people who thrived at Apple were the people who welcomed that desire and passion to learn from working with Steve, and just really were dedicated to the customer and the product. They were willing to give up their weekends and vacation time. And a lot of the people who complained that it wasn’t fair . . . they didn’t see the value of giving all that up versus trying to create the best product for the customer and then sacrificing everything personally to get there.”

He had trouble understanding people who didn’t want that same thing and wondered why they’d be working for him if that was the case. I think Steve had a very low tolerance for people who didn’t care about stuff. He had a very hard time understanding why people would work in these positions and not want to sacrifice everything for them.”

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2 comments

  1. I’m interested by the title. It doesn’t seem to come up in the post.

    This did push my thinking about the culture of school. Interesting connections.

    1. opps….quote in post above is ““It’s almost impossible to come up with really innovative things when you have a deadline and schedule.”

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